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AHEOR

Applied Health Economics and Outcomes Research (AHEOR)

AHE 501: Economics of Health Insurance

Introduces the theories that underpin health insurance products. Discusses the impact of government policies on health insurance products. Explains the principles of cost-effectiveness analysis. Reviews approaches to health insurance used around the world. Discusses the potential impact of health insurance reforms.

AHE 502: Statistics I

Presents descriptive and inferential statistics, including sampling and probability and hypothesis testing. Presents general approaches to ANOVA, Chi-Square, t-tests and linear regression. Students are introduced to the SAS learning environment.

AHE 504: Economic Modeling I

Presents the foundation of cost-effectiveness models used to inform decision makers. Introduces decision analysis models and budget impact analysis. Discusses approaches for handling uncertainty and risk adjustments, determining probability values, costs, other key model parameters, and the importance of perspective in modeling and simulation. Considers the application and presentation of models to policy makers, providers, health care managers, and key stakeholders who have interests in modeled output and the quantification of economic values.

AHE 505: Statistics II

This course begins with an overview of the research process, research methods and health behavior theory and discusses how each step in the research process will determine which statistical methods will be needed to answer the research question. The remainder of the course will teach you how to analyze data using logistic regression, survival analysis, and longitudinal methods. The course also covers propensity scores and propensity score matching as a method of reducing selection bias in observational studies. The course concludes with student presentations of statistical analyses covered in the course and reflection on adequacy of the methods, data, and analytic strategy for answering their research question.

AHE 506: Subjective Outcomes in Health Evaluation

Focuses on concepts, theory, and methods for measuring subjective health outcomes including symptoms, functional status and well-being, health-related quality of life, and satisfaction with health. Explores appropriate tools for measuring subjective health outcomes and considers the importance of evaluating the measurement characteristics of these tools. Covers current requirements for Patient-Reported Outcomes endpoint in filings with US regulatory authorities, including conceptualization, validation and evidentiary standards

AHE 507: Claims-based AHEOR

This course enables students to conduct AHEOR using managed care claims data. The course will discuss topics such as how quality may be assessed through claims data, how claims may be used to guide budget impact modeling, and how claims may be used to generate novel scientific findings. Students will be familiarized with the limitations of claims-based data, and strategies for working to overcome them.

AHE 508: International Health Technology Assessment: Evaluation & Evidence

This course is designed to offer a critical overview of Health Technology Assessments (HTAs) and a practical guidance for optimal evidence generation and synthesis activities from an international perspective. This course discusses the fundamentals of HTAs around the globe and their interface with regulatory bodies, describes the preparation processes for a global and local dossier including HEOR evidence generation activities, and elaborates the decision-making criteria of HTAs. Throughout the course, the evolving nature of HTA assessments throughout the life cycle of a health technology is emphasized.

AHE 509: Epidemiology and Evidence for Outcomes Research

Presents methods and means to evaluate occurrence of disease and effects of interventions on disease incidence, prevalence and outcomes. Covers conduct and synthesis of prospective and retrospective research in generating estimates of the benefits and harms of different interventions and strategies to prevent, diagnose, treat and monitor health conditions. Considers the strengths and weaknesses of research designs and statistical approaches to evidence assessments. Includes methodological challenges in observational research such as bias (systematic error) and confounding (mixing of effects). Discusses adjustments to deal with limitations of evidence and analytical strategies. Explores practical applications of epidemiological practice in outcomes research.

AHE 510: Advanced Research Methods for Applied Observational Studies

Presents advanced methods for conducting observational studies using real-world data. Reviews contemporary usage of real-world databases, exposing students to data coding and classification systems, defining of study variables, and validation of codes in databases. Extensive attention given to techniques for mitigating bias and confounding including use of propensity-scores, disease risk scores, instrumental variables (IV), and interrupted time series designs.

Students are expected to have an understanding of epidemiology principles, methods and knowledge of linear and logistic regression. Understanding survival analysis is a plus as some class readings involve time-to-event analysis. In addition, basic knowledge of SAS software will benefit students in some sections of the course.

AHE 512: Economic Modeling II

Reviews the key concepts of health technology assessment with a focus on cost-effectiveness analysis. Introduces statistical methods to inform decision processes for health interventions, presenting both foundational and more complex decision analytical models. Addresses search strategies to identify the evidence models synthesize and describes tools for assessing the quality of evidence. Covers key components of economic evaluation for the development and running of Excel-based models representing disease and treatment patterns, stages of clinical trials, and the objectives of a model.

AHE 651: Capstone Research Project

Implementation of a project demonstrating ability to manipulate and analyze data to address an AHEOR research question.

AHE 652: Strategic Capstone Portfolio & Presentation

Presentation of a portfolio of experiences in the degree program to demonstrate proficiencies in AHEOR core competencies.


DHSc

Doctor of Health Science in Population Health (DHSc)

DHS 700: Descriptive Research Methods

This course examines descriptive methods used in applied population health research, including survey methodology, qualitative and mixed methods approaches, record abstraction, case studies, correlational and cross-sectional studies, cohort and panel studies, and methods to assess reliability and validity.

DHS 701: Experimental Research Methods

This course examines experimental and quasi-experimental research methods used in applied population health research, including randomized control trials, behavioral trials, non-equivalent groups, pre-test/post-test designs, time series, and methods to address internal and external validity.

DHS 702: Population Health Management Strategies

Provides comprehensive overview of population health, value-based care, and evolution of payment models for the healthcare executive. Prepares leaders to evaluate current models of care and to develop new models based upon organizational preparedness and population needs, including the social determinants of health. Explores clinical care management programs including risk scoring and stratification, transitions of care, pharmacy management, mobile health, care of complex populations, palliative and end of life care, behavioral health, and future trends.

DHS 703: Systematic Reviews & Analysis

This course examines the methods and tools used in conducting and analyzing systematic reviews of the literature, including constructing research questions, defining inclusion and exclusion criteria, search strategy, record abstraction, data management, data synthesis, and methods to address bias and other influences on research outcomes and interpretation. The course will also review recommended protocols for conducting and reporting systematic reviews of the literature and related research (i.e., PRISMA, SQUIRE, etc.).

DHS 704: Population Health Implementation Science I

Presents a multidisciplinary framework and methodology for healthcare leaders to integrate scientific evidence into strategy and operations. Addresses the evaluation of evidence, stakeholder/organizational readiness, systems-thinking, and approaches to implementation. Provides opportunities to develop design strategies, assess data needs, and complete a project implementation plan.

DHS 705: Population Health Implementation Science II

This course applies statistical and methodological concepts to specific implementation research projects conducted in population health, including quality and patient safety improvement, patient and panel risk prediction and management, service line growth strategies, resource management, and other critical operations.

DHS 706: Academic & Professional Writing

This is a writing-intensive course designed to sharpen the academic and professional writing skills of healthcare leaders to produce high quality scholarship and thought leadership.

DHS 750: Beginning Residency

The program requires attendance at two in-person sessions each year of the program. Program Director will be in touch with further details.

DHS 751: Spring Residency

The program requires attendance at two in-person sessions each year of the program. Program Director will be in touch with further details.

DHS 752: Fall Residency

The program requires attendance at two in-person sessions each year of the program. Program Director will be in touch with further details.

DHS 753: Spring Residency

The program requires attendance at two in-person sessions each year of the program. Program Director will be in touch with further details.

DHS 754: Fall Residency

The program requires attendance at two in-person sessions each year of the program. Program Director will be in touch with further details.

DHS 755: Summer Residency

The program requires attendance at two in-person sessions each year of the program. Program Director will be in touch with further details.

DHS 800: Dissertation I

Stage 1 of the dissertation development process. Students must submit the final approved dissertation proposal to receive course credit.

DHS 801: Dissertation II

Stage 2 of the dissertation development process. Students must make satisfactory progress on the dissertation to receive course credit.

DHS 802: Dissertation III

Stage 3 of the dissertation development process. Students must submit the final dissertation document and successfully present the dissertation project to receive course credit.


HDS

Health Data Science (HDS)

HDS 500: Fundamentals of Data Wrangling

Fundamentals of data wrangling and programming using R will be taught in this class. Students will experience the science and art of data wrangling with various datasets. This is a technical course and students will be required to program in R.

HDS 501: Health Informatics and Analytics

Explores the vital roles of data, information, and information systems in the implementation and evaluation of Population Health initiatives, and Value-based Care initiatives. Reviews the various sources and types of data (clinical, financial, utilization, patient-generated, social determinants), techniques, and mechanisms bringing these data types together into a combined 'data asset' that supports the Population Health initiatives. Addresses challenges, obstacles, and organizational approaches to creating this data asset, as well as regulatory and compliance requirements. Hands-on exercises provide real-life experience of working with health data. This course ends with a review of current software systems and applications in population health, extrapolating toward future Population Health Intelligence and Artificial Intelligence directions.

HDS 502: Advanced Data Analysis

Key programming techniques in data analysis such as exploratory data analysis and statistical modeling. The course requires ability to analyze data and program independently in R.

HDS 518: Data Science I

Applies computational and statistical techniques to address or gain insight into a real-world problem. Provides a comprehensive overview of data science, the practice of obtaining, modeling and interpreting data. Explores the process of how to structure applications of analytic methods for analyzing administrative, environmental, social, public health and clinical systems data. Introduces the data analytic process, which includes analytic planning, exploratory data analysis, multivariate statistical methods, statistical inference and practical interpretation of results.

HDS 519: Data Science II

R-based course that builds upon supervised learning algorithms and moves forward into unsupervised learning topics. Proficient R programming skills will be required to construct predictive models.

HDS 527: Analytics Leadership

This course prepares future leaders with expert knowledge and practical capabilities in the evaluation, selection, application and ongoing oversight of the best types of analytics to create learning healthcare systems that may result in continuously improving the demonstrable quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare organizations. The course addresses different types of traditional (descriptive, predictive and prescriptive) and more advanced types of analytics (including those deriving from the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning). Also addressed is the role of Chief Analytics Officers for their healthcare organizations to develop and discuss Clinical and Business Intelligence Plans.

HDS 532: Data Visualization

Explores the art of data visualization, communications, organizational psychology and change management with the goal of driving operational, tactical and strategic decision-making within healthcare organizations. Focuses on how to use data to a) provide knowledge in the most effective manner possible (i.e., provide relevant, timely and complete data to each audience member in a clear and understandable manner that conveys important meaning, is actionable and can affect understanding, behavior and decisions) and b) provide knowledge in the most efficient manner possible (i.e., minimize noise, complexity and unnecessary data or detail given each audience's needs and roles).

HDS 538: Implementation Science

Presents a multidisciplinary framework and methodology to promote the integration of scientific evidence into healthcare practice, policy and research. Addresses Implementation Science and the evaluation of evidence, stakeholder/organizational readiness, systems thinking, and approaches to implementation. Provides opportunities to develop design strategies, assess data needs, and complete a project implementation plan.

HDS 651: Capstone Research Project

Critically analyzes and develops proposals for HDS Capstone Projects. All parts of a proposal are drafted, critiqued, and revised in accordance with the Capstone Guidelines of the HDS program.

HDS 652: Strategic Capstone Portfolio & Presentation

Presentation of a portfolio of experiences in the degree program to demonstrate proficiencies in HDS core competencies.


HPL

Health Policy (HPL)

HPL 500: U.S. Healthcare Organization & Delivery

Provides an overview of the foundational principles of healthcare delivery in the United States. Traces the historical evolution in political, economic, and social contexts, including the distribution and access to medical and other services, the roles of public and private insurance for health care, and the structure of healthcare benefits. Addresses current issues in US healthcare organization, delivery, and financing as well as policies and approaches that influence changes in healthcare delivery.

HPL 504: Health Law & Regulatory Issues

Provides a basic understanding of the foundational areas of Health Care Law: Malpractice; reimbursement from Medicare/Medicaid/Private Insurance; the structure of health care entities; laws controlling Fraud, Abuse and Waste; and economic reform of Health Care. Addresses the study of case law, statutes and regulations, with an eye toward understanding how they support the public policy drivers of cost of health care, access to providers, quality of care, and patient choice. Lectures incorporate the practical application of the law in the healthcare professions. Weekly discussions and quizzes provide students the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the material and to discuss policy issues behind various legal concepts in health care. Discussions and assignments apply course material to "real world" situations encountered in health care.

HPL 505: Legislative, Executive and Regulatory Processes.

This course provides an overview of the U.S. health care system, including a foci on legislative, executive, and regulatory processes, health policy advocacy and the analysis as seen via the lens of the health professional. Students will critically apply real life health policy actions to the stages of public policy, as well as, the identification of relevant political strategies for a positive change in the local, state and/or national system of care. The course is focused around complex and interdependent policy challenges that allied health and medical professionals will face in the health system: ensuring access to health care, reducing costs, improving quality, addressing inequalities, transparency, and improving population health and value based care.

Students will assess the regulatory and legislative health system demands and resources, while learning to analyze policy arguments, augment collaborative partnerships, evaluate evidence and research, and identify political strategies. Critical skills for engaging elected officials, professional organizations and consumers to address population health via policy analysis are integrated in the course.

HPL 506: Health Policy: Analysis and Development

Prepares students to apply policy analysis tools to define and address health policy issues and problems. Examines the complexity of policy problems and provides the basic tools used in policy design, feasibility analysis, implementation and evaluation. Builds on prior coursework and incorporates stakeholder analysis and role of socio-cultural contexts, and economic, legal, and ethical perspectives in establishing a policy analysis framework. Addresses 1) how health policy is made and by whom; 2) the process of policy analysis and the various disciplines necessary to do it well; and 3) the implementation of sound health policy through effective advocacy.

HPL 511: Policy Approaches to Addressing Social Determinants of Health

Examines the Social Determinants of Health (SDoH) descriptors outside of the traditional health care system and the innovative intersectoral policy approaches to address them. Explores funding options, such as Value-Based Payment Models, tobacco legislation, sin taces, etc. Applies strategic intervention options at the community level.

HPL 512: Medicare and Medicaid

The course will provide students with a detailed understanding of the history, administration, financing, benefits, eligibility, and impact of the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Relationships between federal/state agencies and private insurance companies will also be explored. The programs will be examined to gain an understanding of their effectiveness and quality. Current debates and policy alternatives regarding the programs will be explored. Possible future scenarios for the programs will also be discussed.

HPL 513: Effective Communication and Dissemination of Data

Making evidence come to life through effective means of presenting data verbally and visually. Includes communication and dissemination strategies, effective oral presentation guidelines, optimal visual display of quantitative and qualitative data, and the use of media. This course will explore a variety of presentation styles to engage key stakeholder audiences. Both historic and current health topics will be used as examples to explore communication strategies and dissemination techniques.

HPL 515: Refugee & Migrant Health

In this course, students will examine the context of mass migration and immigration in countries around the world; the causes of population movement with specific emphasis on genocide, armed conflict, economic insecurity, and political oppression; unique population health needs of these populations; and cultural implications for research and practice.

HPL 516: Delivering Health Services in Resource-Limited Countries

In this course, students will examine the organization, financing, and delivery of health and healthcare services of developing and least developed countries around the world; review the history of myriad of global partnerships trying to improve population health in these areas; and evaluate the successes and failures of various population health improvement approaches in these countries.

HPL 520: Practice Based Health Statistics

Introduces basics of descriptive and inferential statistics, including sampling, probability, and regression. The course will emphasize interpretation of statistical results, data management and generation of tables and graphs that can inform reports, evaluations, and quality improvement effort in the public health space. Applications include estimation of confidence intervals; testing statistical hypotheses for population means, proportions, and variances; and use of non-parametric tests. Utilizes MS Excel as a software tool to enter and analyze public health data. Uses Philadelphia regional data from the Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC) and CDC National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) data as basis for student assignments.

HPL 550: Comparative Health Systems

This course provides in-depth exploration across a range of international health care systems. The intent is to compare, contrast and critically review international models of healthcare organization, management and delivery. During the course, frameworks and indices for the valid, reliable comparison of international health care systems will be identified and applied. A range of parameters will be analyzed and systematically evaluated- including quality, access, patient safety, efficiency, equity, healthy life expectancy, GDP healthcare costs and healthcare costs per capita. One key focus will be on applicability of international models to the US health care system and the identification of solutions for improvements in US healthcare system management and delivery.

HPL 650: Capstone Seminar & Project

Students develop capstone proposals in accordance with Capstone Guidelines for the health policy program.


HQS

Healthcare Quality and Safety (HQS)

HQS 500: Introduction to Healthcare Quality and Safety

Presents the student with the concepts of HealthCare Quality and Safety as horizontally and vertically integrated throughout the healthcare system. Using the STEEEP framework from the Institute of Medicine's (now National Academy of Medicine) seminal 2001 approach and codified in the World Health Organization's definition of quality, the student learns about safe, timely, efficient, effective, equitable and patient-centered care and their applications in population health and health care delivery.

HQS 505: Advanced Tools and Methods for Healthcare Quality and Safety

Integration of improvement science, complexity science, quality and safety tools and methodologies to develop approaches, behaviors, processes and system design to achieve sustained improvement in population healthcare delivery and outcomes.

HQS 507: Advanced Applications of Healthcare Quality and Safety in Clinical Settings

Participants will complete independent and group work to develop evidence-based improvement plans for three cases that pose medical quality and safety challenges. Learnings from previous courses related to improvement tools, methods, change management, leadership, and data management will be synthesized to determine causes of problems in each scenario and offer recommendations for improvement interventions.

HQS 508: Quality in Post Acute Care Settings

Current post-acute care CMS regulations require an organized, data driven approach to Healthcare Quality and Safety Programs with a focus on an organized framework for Performance Improvement and application of sound quality principles. This course will provide an overview of Healthcare Quality and Safety in the Post-Acute Care space. The focus will be on the scope of services and regulatory requirements for Skilled Nursing Facilities, Home Health and Hospice and public quality reporting. The course will elaborate on the data collection instruments and assessments that drive CMS Home Health Compare, Hospice Compare and Nursing Home Compare. The impact of quality metrics and reimbursement will be explored along with the Six Quality Aims and their application to improve Healthcare Quality and Safety across the healthcare continuum.

HQS 509: Applied Principles of Healthcare Quality

Establishes a basis for critical analysis of issues in healthcare quality and presents conceptual and scientific approaches to the evaluation of the structure, process, and outcome of quality improvement. Participants will apply their learning of Improvement Science, design measurement tools, and analyze quality outcomes through class participation and the development of case-based individual projects.

HQS 512: Business Case for Quality

This course examines each of the contributing factors necessary to develop and evaluate business cases for healthcare quality and safety improvement initiatives. Students will explore: 1) methods of identifying and calculating the cost of poor quality, 2) techniques for estimating the value of a proposed change, 3) barriers to achieving stakeholder buy-in, and 4) best practices for formally writing and presenting a business case.

HQS 512: Business Case for Quality

This course examines each of the contributing factors necessary to develop and evaluate business cases for healthcare quality and safety improvement initiatives. Students will explore: 1) methods of identifying and calculating the cost of poor quality, 2) techniques for estimating the value of a proposed change, 3) barriers to achieving stakeholder buy-in, and 4) best practices for formally writing and presenting a business case.

HQS 515: Applied Principles of Patient Safety

Presents an overview of safety science, safety culture, and human factors engineering theories to provide a framework for a strategic application of safety tools and methods to promote and sustain safety in all healthcare settings. Offers an epidemiological approach to the study of medical errors as a public health issue.

HQS 516: Teaching Quality & Safety

In this course, students will examine the principles of effective adult-based education; evaluate strategies to increase learner satisfaction and knowledge retention; discuss how to implement a 'backwards design' curriculum development strategy for learners; and identify methods to assess learner satisfaction, knowledge attainment, and skill development. Students will also create a lesson plan for an educational program in Healthcare Quality & Safety.

HQS 517: Teaching Health Systems Science

In this course, students will examine the principles of effective adult-based education; evaluate strategies to increase learner satisfaction and knowledge retention; discuss how to implement a 'backwards design' curriculum development strategy for learners; and identify methods to assess learner satisfaction, knowledge attainment, and skill development. Students will also create a lesson plan for an educational program in Health Systems Science.

HQS 650: Capstone Seminar and Project

Identification and development of a significant Healthcare Quality and Safety problem or research question for the Capstone Project. Critically analyzes healthcare quality and safety plans and protocols as developed by student participants.


OPX

Operational Excellence (OPX)

OPX 516: Teaching Operational Excellence

In this course, students will examine the principles of effective adult-based education; evaluate strategies to increase learner satisfaction and knowledge retention; discuss how to implement a 'backwards design' curriculum development strategy for learners; and identify methods to assess learner satisfaction, knowledge attainment, and skill development. Students will also create a lesson plan for an educational program in Operational Excellence.

OPX 520: Change Management

Presents and applies rapid improvements as a transformation strategy for cultural and process related change in healthcare settings that require management of multidisciplinary teams. Develops a framework for healthcare transformation by applying tools to DMAIC and the eight stages of change: 1) Create a sense of urgency 2) Build a guiding coalition 3) Form a strategic vision and initiatives 4) Enlist a volunteer army 5) Enable action by removing barriers 6) Generate short-term wins 7) Sustain acceleration 8) Institute Change

OPX 525: Executing Lean Improvements

Presents and applies Lean methodology as a key tool for process improvement in healthcare settings that require management of multidisciplinary teams. Develops a framework for creating Lean processes, focusing on five principles; 1) Define Value, 2) Map the Value Stream, 3) Establish Flow, 4) Implement Pull, and 5) Strive for Perfection. Compares and contrasts Lean with other process improvement strategies and methodologies used in healthcare to evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches.

OPX 530: Applied Leadership Strategies for Effective Change

Examines the application of leadership strategies for sustaining effective change in the current value-based, healthcare environment using the case study method for learning. Critiques four case-based scenarios to identify and analyze the major uncertainty or dilemma in the case. Analysis considers the impact and outcomes of leaders employing diverse, strategic, data-driven healthcare decisions with the integration of leadership models and theory, and organizational and improvement science in the diagnosis, development and implementation of change interventions. Uses various assessment techniques as a framework in formulating hypothesis for presenting the case problem, analyses and strategic leadership recommendations or proposals for sustaining the efforts by a case protagonist for effective change.

OPX 531: Evaluating Healthcare Organizations

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the myriad ways health care organizations are evaluated. The curriculum reviews regulatory, financial, ranking, satisfaction, and quality evaluation methods, their strengths and weaknesses, and requires students to understand how the nature and value of an organization's performance depends on the vantage point of the assessor.

Students will be assigned health care markets for evaluation, using institutions as examples to develop their own opinion on where they would go to receive care, where they would choose to work, or where they would rank an institution's performance. The course builds to the final presentation of each student's own version of a preferred evaluation methodology.

OPX 532: Project Management Essentials

Provides the foundation, tools, and strategies for project management and execution. Builds on prior course content through use of established guidelines and standards developed by the professional project management community. In alignment with the DMAIC improvement model, the project management framework includes: 1) Initiate; 2) Plan; 3) Execute; 4) Monitor & Control; and 5) Close. Compares and contrasts project, program, and portfolio management as it relates to healthcare improvement strategies.

OPX 535: Strategic Execution

This course explores and applies key concepts to drive performance improvement in healthcare settings. Designs improvement approaches to address system, mid-level, and front-line problems as appropriate. Provides theory and application of continuous improvement. Develops strategies to align high-level objectives with improvement efforts.

Operational Excellence requires the relentless focus on continuous improvement. Strategic Execution provides the framework to design systems and processes to drive outcomes. The disciplines of execution outline best practices that can be leveraged to achieve consistent, high levels of performance. There are always more good ideas than the capacity to implement. With Strategic Execution, students learn how to define and prioritize the vital few goals and coordinate the resources and teams required to effect positive change.

OPX 540: Baldrige

Presents and provides students with a working knowledge of the Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. Explores the five stages and essential elements, known as the LASER model, of the organizational journey to sustained high performance. Established through the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) program was developed to: 1) identify and recognize role-model businesses, 2) establish criteria for evaluating improvement efforts, and 3) disseminate and share best practices. Provides each student with a working understanding of the Baldrige Performance Excellence criteria, how to apply that criteria to an organization, and how to generate meaningful opportunities for organizational improvement based on their responses and interpretations of the criteria.

OPX 650: Capstone Seminar and Project

The Capstone Seminar and Project is the final course in the OPX Master degree program. Using the OPX framework and tools learned throughout the program, students demonstrate a broad and deep knowledge of their field in identifying a well-focused and significant OPX problem or research question for their project. Students engaged in self and peer critiques of work using the JCPH Capstone Guidelines. The end deliverable is a comprehensive A3 post presentation and manuscript submission to a relevant, peer-reviewed academic journal.


POP

Population Health (POP)

POP 500: Essentials of Population Health

Provides a foundation for population health beginning with a working definition, incorporating public health science and policy. From a health system perspective, addresses how to assess population health needs, including Community Health Needs Assessments, clinical and claims data, to develop management strategies which address clinical and social determinants of health. Confronts how to effectively address the national swing from volume-based to value-based care through a deeper understanding of payment models and use of data and technology. Prepares for the transformational changes affecting the future by exploring emerging technologies and disruptive new care models.

POP 500: Essentials of Population Health

Provides a foundation for population health beginning with a working definition, incorporating public health science and policy. From a health system perspective, addresses how to assess population health needs, including Community Health Needs Assessments, clinical and claims data, to develop management strategies that address clinical and social determinants of health. Confronts how to effectively address the national swing from volume-based to value-based care through a deeper understanding of payment models and the use of data and technology. Prepares for the transformational changes affecting the future by exploring emerging technologies and disruptive new care models.

POP 510: Health Economics, Risk, and Finance

This course covers the basic principles of economics and healthcare finance and applies them to risk and insurance. Primary objectives are to illustrate the determinants of value in health care, describe the role of supply and demand, and understand the application of the income statement, balance sheet, and financial analysis to population health decision making. The assignments are designed to give the student experience with dashboards and claims data analysis and presentation.

POP 516: Teaching Population Health

In this course, students will examine the principles of effective adult-based education; evaluate strategies to increase learner satisfaction and knowledge retention; discuss how to implement a 'backwards design' curriculum development strategy for learners; and identify methods to assess learner satisfaction, knowledge attainment, and skill development. Students will also create a lesson plan for an educational program in Population Health.

POP 541: Population Health for Employers

This course considers how general concepts in population health management can be applied specifically by employers and their agents such as benefits consultants and service vendors to the population of employees and dependents. The emphasis is on improving the health and productivity of the workforce, and deriving value from health and well-being benefits and programs, by applying population health concepts and tools. Specific examples of evidence-based programs and tools available for managing employed populations will be studied.

POP 542: Population Health Analytics for Employers

The overall goal of the Population Health Intelligence for Employers (POP 542) course is to educate and train students how to identify, capture, evaluate, apply, and continuously improve the use and measurement of data and information about the purchasing and delivery of healthcare services to optimize workforce health and productivity and top and bottom line company performance. By accomplishing this goal, students will be prepared to become either executives in charge of employee health data analytics or intelligence for either their present or future employers, or to serve as trusted advisors in these areas on behalf of current or prospective employer clients.

POP 543: Wellness, Prevention, & Chronic Disease Management for Employees

This course has been designed to prepare students to evaluate, design, and implement condition-focused and lifestyle-based wellness programs. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, students will explore behavioral change theory and patient engagement approaches to create lasting change within patient populations that drive towards positive cost, quality, and productivity outcomes. Leaders, consultants, and vendors will feel equipped to create an environment where patients are active participants in their healthcare journey.

POP 544: New Models and Employee Health Care

Through a detailed exploration of newer models of care and the application of population health principles, this course will prepare individuals to improve the health of employees while reducing the health care costs. Emphasis is placed on new models of virtual, team-based primary and specialty care. Depth of knowledge is gained in population health as applied to employees, strategies for managing vendors are presented, and the current and future state of care models are evaluated. Utilizing a case study format the student is challenged to apply the presented concepts to create, implement, and present a new model of care for employees.

POP 545: Population Health Law for Employers

Provides a basic understanding of the foundational areas of Health Care law: Medical Liability, Private Insurance; the structure of health care entities; laws controlling Fraud, Abuse and Waste; and economic reform of Health Care. Also covers areas of health law of particular interest to employers, viz. ERISA, OSHA and CDC regulations on workplace safety (particularly during pandemics), how to use employee data in compliance with HIPAA, EEOC and GINA regulations and incentives for participation in and results from employee wellness programs. Addresses the study of case law and regulations, with an eye toward understanding how they support the public policy drivers of cost of health care, access to providers, quality of care, and patient choice. Lectures incorporate the practical application of the law in the healthcare professions. Weekly discussions and quizzes provide students the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the material and to discuss policy issues behind various legal concepts in health care. Discussions and assignments apply course material to "real world" situations encountered in health care.

POP 560: Population Health Strategy & Management I

Provides comprehensive overview of population health, value-based care, and evolution of payment models. Prepares students to evaluate current models of care and to develop new models based upon organizational preparedness and population needs including the social determinants of health. Explores clinical care management programs including risk scoring and stratification, transitions of care, pharmacy management, mobile integrated health, care of complex populations, palliative and end of life care, and integrated behavioral health.

POP 561: Population Health Strategy & Management II

Builds upon Pop 560 by preparing students to apply principles and practical aspects of population health management, value-based care and payment, to clinically integrated networks, accountable care organizations, and health systems. Critically examines organizational readiness for the transition from fee- for-service to value-based care and payment. Explores risk contracting strategies and pitfalls and lessons learned from international population health management programs. Addresses employer-directed health plans, application of technology (including population health information systems, telehealth, predictive analytics, and artificial intelligence), ethical and legal issues, and innovation.

POP 650: Capstone Seminar & Project

POP 650 is designed to provide a culminating experience that demonstrates the student's professional achievement, with integration of the core competencies that have been developed throughout the Masters of Population Health program. A Capstone project is developed in conjunction with the Capstone Director (usually the Program Director) with production of a scholarly paper of publishable quality, and a live or virtual public presentation of the work. Although POP 650 is typically the last course of the curriculum, development of the project can begin 6-12 months before graduation.


PHS

PhD Program (PHS)

PHS 602: Bioethics

This course introduces the discipline of bioethics from a research perspective. The course will provide an overview of the history of bioethics as well as defining key principles and analytical approaches to addressing current ethical issues encountered in human subject research.

PHS 605: Advanced Statistical Methods for Data Analysis

Presents general approaches to multivariate statistical analysis, including elaboration and control of confounding, and key multivariate statistical analysis techniques, i.e., analysis of variance; bivariate linear regression and correlation; multiple linear regression; multiple and partial correlation; and binary and multinomial logistic regression. Analyzes selected datasets, i.e., 2012 Southeastern Pennsylvania Household Health Survey performed by the Public Health Management Corporation, and federal datasets, e.g., NHANES.

PHS 615: Advanced Statistics for Population Health Science: Multi-level Modeling

This course introduces the multilevel model and multilevel statistical modeling (MLM), aka hierarchical linear modeling (HLM), a statistical approach for the analysis of clustered and hierarchical data. MLM can investigate the relationships between individuals and their contextual lives (neighborhoods, hospitals, families, etc.) to determine which individual and contextual variables contribute to outcomes. The course will introduce methods to determine the predictors at both levels and the variance between and within individual and contextual levels. This course also introduces methods for longitudinal modeling approaches and analysis in the same framework. The course will focus primarily on application of the statistical models using a freely available software specific to multilevel analysis (HLM 7). Thus, students who complete the course will be able to analyze multilevel cross-sectional and longitudinal data and interpret the results from such analysis.

PHS 620: Teaching/Learning Seminar

Introduces fundamentals of course design and facilitation for classroom-based and online learning, including instructional design theory, online moderation techniques, technologies for online learning, development of course objectives, the Quality matters Rubric for quality online course design, and support resources available to both faculty and students.

PHS 650: Evaluative and Outcomes Research and Design

This course provides experience in design and critical review of scientific evaluative studies applicable to evaluation of health intervention programming. The course will cover material intended to enable students to critically examine various approaches and methods developed for interventional studies. Specifically, this course will use a classical validity approach to the design and evaluation of health intervention studies. The course will present classical theories of causality and experimental design to include operationalization of variables, threats to validity, and experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental research designs. The culminating assignment for the course is a research proposal for a population-health relevant evaluative research study and as such this course serves to prepare students for future technical writing and proposal development, the cornerstones of scientific communication and funding requests.

PHS 660: Mentored Research Experience

This course is intended as an opportunity for Population Health Science PhD students to gain skills and experience in the conduct of research and in the application of various research methods, and/or to apply already learned skills to real-world research problems. Appropriate research activities include any across the spectrum of research, for example: planning a study, writing a grant application, joining an already underway research project as a research assistant, collecting data, data analysis, and dissemination activities such as authoring or co-authoring a manuscript. The student will choose a research mentor and arrange for the activities and deliverables that will constitute the PHS 660 course.

PHS 680: Advanced Analytic Topics for Health Behavior Science

Survey course of additional conceptual topics and corresponding analytic techniques relevant for health behavior science/ health behavior measurement including additional instruction on confirmatory factor analysis (not covered in PHS710 Advanced Health Behavior Methods and Measurement course), including invariance testing. Course also surveys selected implementation science and evaluation frameworks. The course will focus on conceptual understanding of these topics, their application and interpretation, rather than statistical treatments. The objective of this course is to equip students with expertise in a broad range of techniques and concepts common in health behavior science, and with adequate analytic expertise to conduct original research.

PHS 700: Integrative Research Seminar

This 'journal club' will be convened to discuss, analyze, and review articles from major journals. Its purpose will be to critically evaluate recent articles from the scientific literature. Participants will be expected to read and carefully review all manuscripts selected, and to voice their views in response to several questions such as the significance of the issue(s), appropriateness of the research design, the statistical analyses, and the plausibility of the findings.

PHS 710: Advanced Health Behavior Methods and Measurement

This course provides in-depth and applied measurement science training, and is an opportunity to build on concepts and theories in health behavior and health outcomes assessment and measurement. The central focus will be on the methodology of theory-based instrument development and testing, and the topics will take students through the life-cycle of a health measurement instrument from conceptualization through reliability and validity assessment and structural modeling. The objective of this course is to train students in the principles and practice of good health measurement.

PHS 800: Comprehensive Examination Prep

This is a self-directed course for students to prepare for the PhD Comprehensive Examination, which is a requirement for Advancement to Candidacy for the PhD degree in the College of Population Health. Students will review exam requirements and the body of knowledge that will be tested. See the ''PhD Comprehensive Examination and Dissertation Handbook'' online under the Handbooks section of the Student Resources page at jefferson.edu/jcphsr for more information.

PHS 801: Comprehensive Examination

Students sign up for this course in the trimester in which they will take the PhD Comprehensive Exam. Exam results are recorded on this course. Students must retake this course if they do not pass all parts of the PhD Comprehensive Exam. Grades on subsequent examinations replace prior grades in this course. There is a maximum number of retakes allowed. See the ''PhD Comprehensive Examination and Dissertation Handbook'' online under the Handbooks section of the Student Resources page at jefferson.edu/jcphsr for more information.

PHS 805: Dissertation Proposal Seminar

Students sign up for this course to begin the development of the dissertation proposal. The course includes seminars and other activities to assist the student in developing a dissertation proposal that meets the requirements of the PhD in Population Health Sciences. The course culminates with the preparation of an annotated outline of the draft dissertation proposal.

PHS 807: Dissertation Proposal Defense

Students sign up for this course in the trimester in which they will defend the dissertation proposal. The results of the proposal defense are recorded on this course.

PHS 810: Dissertation Progress

Students sign up for this course after the successful defense of the dissertation proposal. This course is self-directed and provides additional time and support to complete the final dissertation document.

PHS 811: Final Dissertation Defense

Students sign up for this course in the trimester in which they will defend the final dissertation. The results of the final dissertation defense are recorded on this course.


PBH

Public Health (PBH)

PBH 500: Foundations of the US Healthcare System

This course compares the organization, structure and function of health care delivery, public health and regulatory systems across national and international settings. Discussion and analysis of the evolution of healthcare delivery since the 18th century will facilitate the exploration of public health history, philosophy and values. The inclusion of interdisciplinary primary documents will allow for the explanation of social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities. Activities and lecture material will cover the structural elements of healthcare systems including different types of providers. Discussions of their roles and trends in specialization will cover the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion and screening. The role of the primary health system stakeholders will be discussed with specific attention paid to the government.

PBH 501: Foundations of Public Health

This course introduces the graduate student to the field of public health through lectures, readings and experiential learning. Skills gained in this course will be useful to those working in public health, healthcare and related fields. We will begin by discussing the history and basic principles of public health and present an overview of a range of public health challenges including infectious disease, chronic disease and violence. The course will prepare students to be effective and accurate academic writers. We will cover the appropriate use of APA format, public health communication and evidence (literature) identification. We will discuss the social determinants of health, health disparities and health equity. The course orients the student to the role of the Public Health Service as well as federal, state, and local public health departments and agencies in the US. The course introduces key national public health initiatives such as Healthy People 2020 and 2030, as well as an overview of public health research, maternal and child health, environmental health, substance use, and violence as a public health issue. This course addresses the links between public health and healthcare, health policy, law and health behavior. Finally, this course introduces the student to the public health literature and exposes the student to public health professionals. The course will address current public health issues as they arise.

PBH 502: Society, Behavior, and the Environment

Addresses behavioral, social, environmental and cultural factors related to individual and population health, and health disparities over the life span. Examines research and practice that contribute to the development, administration and evaluation of public health programs and policies that promote and sustain healthy lives and environments for individuals and populations.

PBH 504: Fundamentals of Statistics for Research

Introduces basics of descriptive and inferential statistics, including sampling and probability, in estimation and statistical decisions as used in public health. Applications include estimation of confidence intervals; testing statistical hypotheses for population means, proportions, and variances; and use of non-parametric tests. Utilizes Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) as software tool to enter and analyze public health data. Uses Philadelphia regional data from the Public Health Management Corporation as basis for student projects.

PBH 505: Fundamentals of Statistics for Practice

Introduces basics of descriptive and inferential statistics, including sampling, probability, and regression. The course will emphasize interpretation of statistical results, data management and generation of tables and graphs that can inform reports, evaluations, and quality improvement effort in the public health space. Applications include estimation of confidence intervals; testing statistical hypotheses for population means, proportions, and variances; and use of non-parametric tests. Utilizes MS Excel as a software tool to enter and analyze public health data. Uses Philadelphia regional data from the Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC) and CDC National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) data as basis for student assignments and projects.

PBH 506: Fundamentals of Epidemiology

Introduces epidemiology and its application in public health. Addresses basic epidemiologic terminology and definitions. Presents public health problems in terms of magnitude, person, time, place, and disease frequency. Examines correlation measures between risk factors and disease outcomes; strengths and weaknesses of standard epidemiologic study designs; and ethical and legal issues related to epidemiologic data. Students calculate basic epidemiology measures, draw inferences from epidemiologic reports, and use information technology to access, evaluate, and interpret public health data

PBH 507: Fundamentals of Environmental Health

Introduces environmental health sciences. Addresses social, political and economic factors that influence environmental health, including identification of major pollutants, their sources and adverse health effects. Examines general mechanisms of toxicity following environmental exposures, including the impact of such exposures on the health of children. Studies risk assessment of environmental hazards and surveys government regulations and their significance in protecting human health. Specific topics include solid, liquid, and hazardous waste, food safety, water and air pollution, and climate change.

PBH 508: Applied Toxicology and Public Health

Introduces basic concepts of toxicology and their applications in the field of environmental health. Real-world examples of environmental exposures taken from current and historical news reports and their effects on human health will be examined, and potential interventions to mitigate these effects will be discussed using quantitative cost-benefit analyses. Assignments, including the discussion board, exams and the student project, will require students to apply the concepts discussed in the course to design science-based environmental health interventions. The vocabulary and concepts discussed in this course will be useful to students professionally as they develop and implement environmental health interventions for their institutions and patients and personally as they evaluate their own behaviors in pursuit of a healthy lifestyle.

PBH 509: Foundations of Policy & Advocacy

Introduces public health policy and advocacy. Surveys legal structure that supports health and public health policy. Addresses process by which policy is developed and implemented and explores the role of advocacy in this process. Focuses on key public and private stakeholders and examines public health policy initiatives that originate at federal, state, local, and institutional levels. Students analyze policies related to topics such as maternal and child health, obesity, tobacco control, environmental health, climate change preparedness, and delivery of primary care. Emphasizes the role of public health advocacy planning and implementation.

PBH 510: Health Research Methods

This course presents a fundamental framework for health research methods, including critical analysis of public health and health services research literature. Each research method/technique and associated topic areas will be presented through lecture, and reinforced through small group exercises and homework. You will be developing a research proposal this semester. As such, I encourage you to select a research topic area of interest. The skills you gain in proposal writing will serve you in many different contexts in the future. Course will include an overview of the field of health services research as it applies to public health, with the capacity for critical appraisal of the literature and with the ability to design a basic public health/health services research project.

PBH 511: Health Communication

Introduces health communication and relevant theories and models of individual and social change. Topics include planning, implementation, and evaluation of health communication and social marketing campaigns; cultural competency; health literacy; skills in patient care communication; role of communication in health care and public health promotion and disease prevention; media advocacy; mass media and health; entertainment-education; and the similarities and differences between U.S.-based and global health communication. Strategies in health communication and social marketing are reviewed across the levels of the social ecological model, including at the interpersonal, community, organizational, and policy levels.

PBH 512: Qualitative Research Methods

Introduces philosophy, techniques and uses of common forms of qualitative research with an emphasis on data collection and analysis. Addresses strengths and limitations of qualitative research and ethical issues surrounding its use. Students practice qualitative research methods through participant observation, fieldwork, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, and case studies.

PBH 513: Public Health Law and Ethics

Introduces students to public health law and ethics. Examines key elements of the U.S. legal system that govern and influence public health, including the U.S. Constitution, federal and state laws, administrative law, and judicial decisions. Considers the convergence and influence of ethical principles and law in the context of public health practice, current events and healthcare reform.

PBH 514: Dimensions of Global Health

Explores major issues in global health from the perspective of multiple health disciplines. Emphasizes global/local aspects of public health. Focuses on issues in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) including global burden of disease; social, structural, and environmental determinants of health; health and socio-economic development; advocacy, policy, trade and health; and health and human rights. Discusses global health from perspectives of non-communicable diseases, the built environment, water and sanitation, nutrition, tobacco, maternal/child health, unintentional and intentional injuries, One Health, and communicable diseases such as HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Examines the roles of colonization, cultural humility, health care delivery systems and global institutions as they relate to worldwide health issues. Students in this class will be responsible for all the material covered during this term. This will include material addressed through activities, both in and out of the classroom, as well as homework, readings, and other assignments. At the end of this course, students will have a broader understanding of and the ability to actively apply the concepts of diversity, equity, and inclusion to world health issues.

PBH 515: Cultural Humility & Cultural Competency in Population Health & Health Services

Explores cultural competency as it applies to health/human service practitioners. Facilitates development of cultural competence and humility in one's self, colleagues, health service and public health work environments. Reviews literature related to diversity and cultural competence as it relates to disparities in health status and access to quality care. Applies students' knowledge and personal reflection to their professional work and develops an individual or community health initiative that reflects cultural humility and competency. Students also develop an action plan that promotes diversity and cultural awareness in professional development and organizational settings.

PBH 516: Health & Human Rights

Focuses on human rights and the public health of Refugees, Immigrants, and the Internally Displaced. Begins with an overview of how universal human rights are described and upheld by international human rights legislation and key global and national organizations. Analyzes unique populations that have been personally affected or whose story accurately demonstrates an aspect of human rights on a global scale. Includes populations with both historic (e.g., native Americans) or current (e.g., Syria and Yemen) perspectives. Utilizes multiple methodologies of case studies, IQ2, debates, 'flipped classroom,' documentaries, videos, photojournalism, team and individual projects and presentations.

PBH 518: Applied Policy and Advocacy

This Applied Policy and Advocacy course was designed for students who would like to continue their careers in health policy. The course focuses on public policy analysis and developing supporting evidence. Students will complete a variety of assignments that deepen their understanding of health policy and prepare them to appraise relevant information critically. The course also focuses on communicating information in different mediums to reach stakeholders, including policymakers.

PBH 520: Program Planning, Implementation & Evaluation

Program planning, implementation, and evaluation are essential skills for a public health professional. Students will work in teams of two or three, as a hypothetical public health organization. Working as a team, students will learn to perform various roles in an organization that are associated with program planning, implementation and evaluation, such as: assess and prioritize community needs; identify evidence-based best practices for choosing interventions; develop and practice writing SMART objectives and logic models; understand how to engage and communicate with stakeholders and community members; as well as how to organize a project budget, staffing plan and timeline. In addition, students will learn how to develop implementation and evaluation plans with a focus on summative evaluation (process, impact and outcome evaluation).

PBH 550: Public Health and Clinical Practice

The purpose of clinician-public health training is to ensure students understand their reach as both public health and clinical professionals. Being a competent and transformative provider is not limited to correctly assessing the clinical needs of patients and providing the most appropriate treatment, to be an effective provider care must extend beyond simply understanding the biology of disease --it involves contextualizing care to address the environmental, psychosocial, community, and other factors that contribute to overall wellness. Social determinants and environmental factors have significant impacts on health outcomes. This course prepares students to integrate the core tenants of public health into clinical practice so they can effectively address the social determinants of health, health disparities and health equity throughout their careers. Topics include reducing healthcare disparities through clinician-patient partnerships and community-clinician partnerships. Additionally, the course will address disparities in primary, secondary and tertiary care, community influences on health, access to healthcare, identification of community needs and community assets, effective communication and cultural competency.

PBH 602: Advanced Social and Behavioral Theory and Intervention

Advanced presentation and analysis of behavioral, social and cultural factors related to individual and population health and health disparities over the life span. Critically examine individual, interpersonal, and community level evidence-based research and practice that contribute to development, administration, and evaluation of public health intervention programs and policies that promote and sustain healthy lives. Focuses heavily on published literature and intensive class discussion.

PBH 603: Substance Abuse as a Public Health Issue

This course will provide an overview of the contemporary challenges in addressing substance use as a public health problem. Students will learn about the personal and environmental factors that often contribute to substance use, as well as the downstream consequences, including HIV and hepatitis C. Students will also learn public health strategies to address substance use, including primary prevention and harm reduction. Finally, issues around drug policy at the local, state and federal level will be discussed. While this course will use opioids and the crisis in Philadelphia as the primary case study, other drugs will be touched upon as well. The course combines lecture, interactive class exercises, and group discussion.

PBH 605: Advanced Health Statistics

Presents general approaches to multivariate statistical analysis, including elaboration and control of confounding, and key multivariate statistical analysis techniques, i.e., analysis of variance; bivariate linear regression and correlation; multiple linear regression; multiple and partial correlation; and binary and multinomial logistic regression. Analyzes selected datasets, i.e., 2012 Southeastern Pennsylvania Household Health Survey performed by the Public Health Management Corporation, and federal datasets, e.g., NHANES.

PBH 606: Advanced Epidemiology

Builds on PBH 506. Presents examples of epidemiological theory and methods such as: Multivariable analysis, logistic regression, sampling and weighting methods, cohort analysis, confounding, and effect modification.

PBH 607: Infectious Disease Epidemiology

This course utilizes fundamentals of epidemiology and applies them specifically to infectious diseases. Basic principles of infectious disease epidemiology, transmission, prevention and control will be covered along with methods and resources to perform associated disease surveillance, outbreak investigations, and observational epidemiological research.

PBH 609: Geo-Based Information Systems (GIS) Mapping

Introduction to mapping and analyzing health related data using a geographic information system (GIS). Mapping exercises address substantive health care policy and planning issues such as cancer morbidity and mortality, health patterns of uninsured and poor populations, and environmental hazards.

PBH 611: LEAP Capstone-Integrative Learning Experience, Part 1

This is part 1 of a 2-semester course. This course will provide LEAP students an important opportunity to demonstrate a holistic understanding of the public health field and the important link between public health, population health and healthcare.

Part 1 of this 2 semester course will provide support to LEAP students in the spring term of the program in order to assure they can process, integrate, refine and apply the tools and skills they are acquiring in their MPH core courses, their elective courses and the skills they are developing during their Applied Practice Experience (APE), formally referred to as clerkship. Additionally, this course will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of programmatic, and individual goal specific, public health competencies.

The course will address identification and evaluation of evidence to inform public health practice. Additionally, the course will focus on synthesizing and translating evidence to inform practice and improve communication to the lay community.

Students will demonstrate integration of knowledge through the completion of authentic individual and group assignments.

PBH 612: Capstone-Integrative Learning Experience for LEAP, Part 2

This is part 2 of a 2-semester course. This course will provide LEAP students an important opportunity to demonstrate a holistic understanding of the public health field and the important link between public health and healthcare.

Part 2 will provide support to LEAP students in the final term of the program to assure they can process, integrate, refine and apply the tools and skills they are acquiring in their MPH core courses, their elective courses and during their Applied Practice Experience (APE), also referred to as 'clerkship'. Additionally, this course will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of programmatic, and individual goal specific, public health competencies.

The course will address leadership skill development, identification and evaluation of evidence to inform public health practice. The course will focus on synthesizing and translating evidence to inform practice and improve communication to the lay community.

Students will demonstrate integration of knowledge through the completion of authentic individual and group assignments. A secondary objective of this course is to prepare students for the comprehensive exam.

PBH 613: Capstone-Integrative Learning Experience for LPHT, Part 1

This course provides the support to develop your Capstone Project. The class sessions cover: 1. the scope and requirements of the Capstone Project, 2. the JCPH Capstone Project policies, procedures, and requirements for completing the MPH degree and 3. the project development steps, which include:
Developing identifying the key elements / dimensions of the project and structuring that into a background and significance section clearly articulating the public health context; Developing well-defined research question(s)/problem statement and specific aims for the proposed project; Identifying a methodology or process plan that is in alignment with the research question or capstone project respectively. This will include the target population, recruitment approach, data collection, project implementation, analytic strategy and/or other steps; * Identifying the public health competencies expected to be addressed through the Capstone Project.

PBH 614: Capstone-Integrative Learning Experience for LPHT, Part 2

This is part 2 of the Capstone-ILE experience (C-ILE). This course will provide LPHT students an important opportunity to demonstrate a holistic understanding of the public health field and the important link between public health, population health and healthcare.

This course is designed to support students as they move their individually designed projects (designed, approved and begun in PBH 613) to completion. Students will be expected to draw on all their coursework as they prepare a manuscript, poster and podium presentation describing their work. At the end of PBH 614 students present their C-ILE work to the Jefferson Community and other interested parties.

PBH 651: Clerkship - Applied Practice Experience (C-APE)

The MPH C-APE is a zero credit supervised field experience, which is required by all graduate public health programs accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). It is integral to the preparation of an effective public health practitioner by providing the student with the opportunity to integrate newly acquired public health competencies (see Appendix A). To successfully meet this program requirement, the student must complete a minimum of 120 hours in an approved practice setting and by attending approved community events, and participate in an approved interprofessional activity.

PBH 660: Clinical Public Health

Dual degree medical (MD, DO) and Advanced Standing students will attend presentations where they will hear from dual-trained guest speakers about how to integrate their public health training with their clinical training. Additionally, students will be assessed on the below competencies through a series of interactive and independent assignments.



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